| Home | I*EARN Romania | www.iearn.org | Activities |

ARGENTINA

Araucanians were the last indians who settled down in Argentina 250 years ago. This migration caused a process of adaptation and fusion with the people who were there before (MAPUCHES), without violence and wars. They were the native population of Chile. When the Spanish people arrived, Araucanians began their migration to the Patagonia and the Pampa, opposing resistance to the whites. Araucanians were small people with short heads. They were agricultors and they grew corn, potatoes, chili, beans and pumpkin. They lived in wooden houses. They worked metals, and they made shields and jewels with them. Araucanians were also good potters, basket makers and excellent weavers, outstanding with their typical "ponchos". When Araucanians came to Argentina, they took up hunting and harvesting, adapting themselves to a nomadic life. They used the leather owning as their dwelling, taking it from one place to another. They slept over sheep skins and children were tied to a little cot that mothers would carry on their back when they moved from place to place. They used to wear a kind of blanket as trousers, a poncho and leather boots. Women combed their hair in two large plaits and they covered themselves with blankets they held to their waists with colourful strips.

Paola Acuna
11 years old
Windlands School of English
Zapala - Neuquen
Patagonia - Argentina


As the "cow-boy" is the typical dweller of the west of North America, the "gaucho" is the typical inhabitant of the vast prairies and pampas" of Argentina, Uruguay and the South of Brazil. In these countries distances are very large, and the towns are very far one from another. The "gaucho" always goes riding a horse, doing rural work and looking after the cattle.

Emili Lopez
8 years old
Windlands School of English
Zapala - Neuquen
Patagonia - Argentina
Traditions are part of a culture of a country. We, Argentinians, keep many of them: to drink "mate" (a drink that tastes like tea), to have a "barbecue", to dance our typical dances such as the "zamba" or the "malambo". What our traditional man (the "gaucho") wears is closely related to what he does. He generally works in the country. He wears a black jacket, a hat to protect himself from the sun, a scarf tied to his neck, baggy peasant trousers and riding boots. The elements the "gaucho" uses in our pampas, such as whips, bolas, belts and boots, are fully made of leather. The women of the country are called "paisanas". They wear large skirts or dresses, blouses and shawls over their shoulders. They comb their hair in plaits or in a bun. Another typical clothing is the "poncho". It is a rectangular woolen shawl, with a gap in its length to pass the head through. It often has fringes on the borders and it is very warm. Every region in Argentina has it typical "poncho", with characteristic colours and forms.


Next page